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Twitter chief Jack Dorsey defended Tuesday his company's decision to allow far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones to use the platform to spread his message, saying he hasn't broken user rules.

Twitter, which now stands out as one of the few social media sites refusing to curtail Jones's online reach, has been attacked by conservatives claiming that the platform is stifling them as it aims to purge fake accounts and automated bots.

Tuesday, Dorsey said neither Jones nor his InfoWars account will be removed. The InfoWars podcasts serve as advertising for a wide range of wellness and survivalism products, making Jones as much as $18 million per year.

Facebook and YouTube acted hours after Apple removed Jones from its podcast directory on Monday.

Publishing platforms have faced strong pressure to take action against Jones and Infowars over the past few months, but Apple was the first major company to sanction the broadcaster in its entirety.

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Jones' Instagram (owned by Facebook) account is still active, as is his Periscope account, which is owned by Twitter.

He stated that Jones "hasn't violated our rules" yet, but Dorsey says that rules will be enforced, and the platform is committed to maintaining "a healthy conversational environment" while (hopefully) watching out for bot-driven amplification of tweets.

Dorsey said Twitter did not want to take "one-off actions to make us feel good in the short term, and adding fuel to new conspiracy theories". In a series of tweets, Dorsey explains that Twitter enforces its rules "impartially, regardless of political viewpoints".

Dorsey also appeared to reference the decisions by other big tech firms in recent days to shut down Jones and Infowars. "Twitter is reflective of real conversations happening in the world and that sometimes includes perspectives that may be offensive, controversial, and/or bigoted", the document read. Dorsey said in his posts that "we've been awful at explaining our decisions in the past".

In a ticktock on Monday's events, CNN's Dylan Byers revealed that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg personally stepped in to remove four of Jones' pages.


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