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United States fashion retailer Gap became the latest giant corporation to apologise to China for selling a T-shirt with an "incorrect" map that did not feature Taiwan and other territories it claims.

The company said they would be undertaking "rigorous reviews" to ensure that it doesn't happen again.

Gap Inc has apologised for selling a shirt with an incorrect map of China after photos of the shirt found in an outlet store in Canada made the rounds online.

United States clothing retailer Gap apologised late Monday for selling T-shirts with an "incorrect" map of China, after it became the latest among foreign companies that China has taken offence with in relation to its territorial claims.

The apology came after a person posted pictures of the T-shirt on Chinese social media network Weibo, saying that Chinese territories, including South Tibet, the island of Taiwan and the South China Sea, were omitted from the map.

Gap Inc. issued an apology Tuesday after upsetting internet users in China for printing a map of their country on one of its T-shirts that didn't include Taiwan.

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Gap is not the first global brand to bruise China's long fingers and tender toes, but it has apologized just the same.

Gap did not say if the product would be pulled from other markets where it is being sold.

"We sincerely apologize for this unintentional error", said the company, which issued the statement through its public relations firm APCO after making a similar apology late Monday on its Weibo account. China claims sovereignty as well to a large area within the South China Sea that includes areas other countries claim as theirs such as the Philippines and Vietnam.

In January, Australia's Qantas Airways changed its website classification of Taiwan and Hong Kong from separate countries to Chinese territories, blaming its earlier approach on an "oversight".

On April 25, it sent dozens of worldwide airlines a written threat of severe punishments if they don't change their websites to declare that Taiwan is part of China - a move that provoked a strong pushback from the White House.


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